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Anglian Prince is sold

21 Jul 2011
The former ETV Anglian Prince has been sold to Swedish operators. (Photo courtesy of H Hoffmann)

The former ETV Anglian Prince has been sold to Swedish operators. (Photo courtesy of H Hoffmann)

Britain’s last traditional salvage tug, the Anglian Prince has been sold for further service with Rederi AB Nestor of Pitea, Sweden, and managers Marine Carrier AB.

The tug left Hull docks in the UK on 14 June bearing the new name Herakles and flying the Maltese flag. It is understood that the tug was bound for Montreal and its first assignment for its new owners.

Anglian Prince was no stranger to the Port of Hull, which was its original home port when it was delivered to its first owners, the United Towing Company Ltd, as the Salvageman in 1980.

A product of the Chung Wah shipyard in Hong Kong, Salvageman was a deepsea salvage tug of 69.04m in length, powered by four Ruston 12RK 3ACM diesels generating 11,280 bhp to drive two controllable pitch propellers. The result was a bollard pull of 170 tons and a maximum speed of 17.5 knots.

Salvageman was every bit a traditional salvage tug of the time, designed for long distance towing and assignments where a high bollard pull was a real advantage. In 1989 modifications were made in an attempt to fit the vessel for anchor handling but it was sold later the same year. After passing through the hands of several owners, the tug went to the Spanish operator Boluda in 1991 and was renamed Hispania.

Klyne Tugs (Lowestoft) Ltd purchased the tug in August 1996, renamed it Anglian Prince and gave it a new lease of life. In 1998 Anglian Prince became part of the fleet of Emergency Towing Vessels (ETVs) operated by Klyne under contact to the UK’s Maritime & Coastguard Agency (MCA). It was stationed on the west coast of Scotland at Stornoway and remained in operation working out of that location until being replaced just a few months ago.

Whilst on the Scottish west coast Anglian Prince became popular with the local maritime community, attending many incidents, mainly in bad weather and sometimes travelling considerable distances into the North Atlantic to assist casualties. Just a few months after taking up station the tug stood by a disabled trawler Sundari for 25 hours in force 7 winds, providing a lee for shelter and eventually taking the vessel in tow. It was the fourth significant incident in a very short time and one for which the Captain and crew received a commendation for “a remarkable feat of seamanship”. Since that incident there have been many more, including towage in atrocious conditions, refloating operations, and escorting operations through the treacherous waters of the Minches.

Since the activities of Klyne Tugs were taken over by the J P Knight Group in December 2007, the ETV fleet has become an integrated part of the parent company and carries the Knight funnel livery. Earlier in the year Anglian Prince was replaced by the company’s fifth vessel, the anchor handler Anglian Earl, for ‘commercial’ reasons. Anglian Earl complies fully with the requirements of the MCA contract and has been used regularly to cover dry docking and maintenance periods for all four ETVs. Anglian Prince was put in ‘warm lay-up’ in the Alexandra Dock in Hull and has remained there until its disposal.

As mentioned in the June issue of MJ, the prospect of the British Government making a ‘U’ turn and deciding to retain the ETVs is very unlikely in spite of strong feelings expressed by the shipping industry and local authorities. That makes for an uncertain future for the remaining ETVs, Anglian Princess, Anglian Sovereign, Anglian Monarch and Anglian Earl.

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The former ETV Anglian Prince has been sold to Swedish operators. (Photo courtesy of H Hoffmann)

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