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Countdown rolls for Germany’s JWP terminal

15 Sep 2011
The €1bn common-user terminal is billed as the first deepwater box facility in Germany.

The €1bn common-user terminal is billed as the first deepwater box facility in Germany.

The final construction countdown has begun at the JadeWeser Port (JWP) container terminal in Wilhelmshaven, but rail link development could be delayed.

A JWP spokesperson said construction of the €1bn common-user terminal, billed as the first deepwater box facility in Germany, is on schedule and within budget. Currently under build is a nine berth tug harbour. Construction is in the hands of  a consortium grouping Johann Bunte Papenburg, Möbius Hamburg, Hecker Oldenburg and Voss Cuxhaven.

The terminal will open in early August 2012 with at least 1km of the eventual 1.7km quayside ready and the whole terminal up and running a year later to handle boxships drawing up to 17m independent of tide.

The inauguration date is nine months later than originally planned. Operators Eurogate and Maersk’s APM Terminals sought the delay because of the economic situation. However recent declines in container handling in Hamburg and Bremerhaven are now being reversed, with both ports reporting double digit increases so far this year.

Lower Saxony Minister of Economic Affairs Jörg Bode said, “Global developments have proved us right in supporting this unique project. It will have an amazing impact on the whole region.” He had just visited Daewoo in South Korea, which is building twenty 400m long, 18,000 TEU ships for Maersk, ships which will call at the JWP.

Despite on-target terminal construction and the prospect of better handling however, reports said electrification of the 52km long Deutsche Bahn rail link between the JWP and Oldenburg on the main network, originally planned for completion late 2014, will not now be finished until 2016.

Currently only diesel traction is possible on the stretch and JWP chief Axel Kluth said the electrification delay was “not all that dramatic. We can already use diesel locomotives as far as Prague.” Double track expansion of the Oldenburg stretch is already underway and traffic will increase from a capacity of 52 trains a day now to 130 by 2025.

By Tom Todd

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The €1bn common-user terminal is billed as the first deepwater box facility in Germany.

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